“Veier til frafall”. En kvantitativ studie av psykisk helse og frafallsintensjoner i høyere utdanning: Et selvbestemmelsesteoretisk perspektiv

Sara Madeleine Kristensen has conducted a cross-sectional study of first year Bachelor students in Biology and assessed their motivation, psychological health, and intentions of dropout. She presented her thesis entitled “Veier til frafall. En kvantitativ studie av psykisk helse og frafallsintensjoner i høyere utdanning: Et selvbestemmelsesteoretisk perspektiv” on June 22nd, 2017 and thus obtained her Master’s degree.

 

Abstract

en-kvantitativ-studie-av-psykisk-helse-og-frafallsintensjoner-i-h-yere-utdanning-pdfThe lack of, or low, motivation and perceived competence have previously been shown to be paramount in students’ decision to drop out of their education. However, recent studies have shown that psychological issues, such as anxiety and depression, is the leading cause of dropout amongst high school students. This study aims to shed light on ill-being and the dropout phenomenon in higher education. 174 biology students from a university in Norway participated in this quantitative survey. A theorized model in accordance to Self-determination Theory, based on previous research and motivational models, was proposed. First, it was assumed that a controlling teaching style would predict a lack of motivation in the students and frustration of their basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Second, it was expected that need frustration would positively predict amotivation and ill-being, and negatively predict perceived competence. Finally, it was assumed that amotivation and psychological ill-being would have a positive prediction on dropout intentions, and that perceived competence would negatively predict the students’ intentions to drop out. Two path analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized model and an alternative model. It was further assumed that there was a significant correlation between the variables in the study. A bivariate correlation analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between the variables. Lastly, it was presumed that teacher control and need frustration had significant, indirect effects on dropout intentions. The results show that the hypotheses in the study are supported. The assumptions in the theorized model are supported by the results; teacher control, need frustration, amotivation, and perceived competence had a significant prediction on students’ ill-being and their dropout intentions. Further, there were significant correlations between the studies variables. Lastly, teacher control and need frustration had significant, indirect effects on dropout intentions through the full mediation of amotivation and perceived competence.

Link to BORA and  to the thesis

 

About the author

Sara Madeleine Kristensen : Former MSc student

Sara Madeleine Kristensen

Former MSc student

I have studied the phenomenon of dropping out of higher education in light of amotivation, teacher control, perceived competence, basic psychological need frustration and ill-being.


sara.madeleine@hotmail.com
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The story of bioCEED or how to grow a SoTL culture from scratch

Oddfrid Førland, Vigdis Vandvik and Roy Andersson have published the article “The story of bioCEED or how to grow a SoTL culture from scratch“.

Abstract

There has been a gradual change over time towards an increased focus on the collegial and cultural aspects of teaching and learning. According to this perspective, quality emerges not within the individual, but within communities of teachers and students. Developing a quality culture requires a cultural shift supported by training and development activities to ensure that the teachers, as a collegium, have the knowledge and will to develop and change towards learner-centered teaching. Building a scholarly and collegial teaching culture, using the research culture as a model, was a first priority of Centre of Excellence in Biology Education (bioCEED). This paper discusses how a shift towards such a collegial Scholarly Teaching and Learning (SoTL) culture can come about, using the story of bioCEED as a case.

Reference and link to the article

Førland, O., Vandvik, V. and Andersson, R. (2016) The story of bioCEED or how to grow a SoTL culture from scratchProceedings of The 38th ANNUAL EAIR FORUM. https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/publication/21da69fd-e9cf-491d-926b-46d4d5e53751

 

About the author

Roy Andersson : Associate Professor II

Roy Andersson

Associate Professor II

 

+46 46 222 49 07
roy.andersson@cs.lth.se
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Oddfrid Førland : Advisor, Centre Coordinator

Oddfrid Førland

Advisor, Centre Coordinator

 

+47 55 58 22 24
Oddfrid.Forland@uib.no
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Vigdis Vandvik : Professor, Centre Leader

Vigdis Vandvik

Professor, Centre Leader

 
I am the Centre Director of bioCEED, and am responsible for overseeing the activities and development of the center in relation to our plans, deliverables, and long-term goals.

+47 55 58 33 32
Vigdis.Vandvik@uib.no
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bioCEED articles presented at MNT-konferansen 2017

This year’s MNT-konferansen “Transformative education” took place in Oslo, Hotel Soria Moria on March 30th-31st. bioCEED contributed with 10 articles and corresponding presentations as well as an overview of the goals and activities of the Centre of Excellence. The full list of contributions and authors is found below with links to the articles published in the special edition of the Nordic Journal of STEM Education.

 

All articles submitted to the conference are available HERE.

The effect of a mobile-application tool on biology students’ motivation and achievement in species identification: A Self-Determination Theory perspective

Lucas Jeno, John-Arvid Grytnes and Vigdis Vandvik have recently published the article “The effect of a mobile-application tool on biology students’ motivation and achievement in species identification: A Self-Determination Theory perspective”.

A new research published by researchers at bioCEED has found that using an app (ArtsApp) to identify sedges helps students correctly identify more species, than using the traditional textbook method. Results of the experiment with 70 students from BIO revealed that the students found identifying species more interesting and enjoyable when using a smartphone or tablet. The students felt that they also were more competent after using the app than when using the book. These results are important because when students are undergraduate, identifying species could be difficult and uninteresting. By using modern technology, the teachers could enhance the students´ interest and learning in ways that perhaps is not possible when using a textbook. The study was published online in Computers & Education in December 2016 (see link below).

Abstract

skjermbilde-2017-01-09-09-52-31Biology students traditionally use a textbook in the field and on courses to identify species, but now a new mobile-application tool has been developed as an alternative. Guided by Self-Determination Theory (SDT) we conducted an experimental study to test the effect of the mobile-application, relative to the traditional textbook, on students’ intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, and achievement. Seventy-one students were randomly assigned to either an experimental condition (mobile application – ArtsApp) or control condition (textbook – Lids flora). As hypothesised, the students using ArtsApp had higher intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, and achievement, compared to the textbook control group, with medium to large effect sizes. Furthermore, using the mobile application, relative to the textbook, predicted intrinsic motivation, which in turn, predicted higher achievement scores in a path analysis. Lastly in a hierarchical regression analysis, intrinsic motivation and autonomous motivation accounted over and above in students’ interest for species identification, and importance of knowing species. These results are in line with SDT’s theorising: emphasising that when students act out of interest, choice, and have an internal locus of causality, they achieve better outcomes, presumably because these satisfy students’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Factors facilitating this are interest, choice, and feedback, which we argue are in-built functions in the mobile application as opposed to the textbook, and which might account for the positive results. Further studies with several student-groups and complex designs are needed before inferring causality across educational levels. Based on the present study, we recommend that biology teachers in higher education employ mobile application tools in species identification due to increases in motivation and a higher degree of accurate identification of sedges.

Reference and link to the article

Jeno, L. M., Grytnes, J.-A. and Vandvik, V. (2015). The effect of a mobile-application tool on biology students’ motivation and achievement in species identification: A Self-Determination Theory perspective. Computers and Education, 107, 1-12

About the author

Lucas M. Jeno : PhD student

Lucas M. Jeno

PhD student

 
I am a PhD candidate/scholar responsible of investigating teaching and learning related issues at bioCEED. My main interest is on student learning and motivation, and how teachers motivate their students.
 
My projects

+47 48 13 46 43
Lucas.Jeno@uib.no
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Encouraging Active Learning in Higher Education: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

Lucas Jeno, PhD student at bioCEED, has recently published the article “Encouraging Active Learning in Higher Education: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective”.

Abstract

Based on the work of Self-Determination Theory, this article suggests how to implement Self-Determination Theory based principle in a learner-centered perspective. Higher education has traditionally rested on learning methods that render passive students. Societal changes require self-regulatory skills and an active motivational set. However, lack of theoretical, empirical and practical driven theory in implementation of learner-centered education has lead to a philosophical debate. It is argued for a holistic model for implementing principles derived from Self-Determination Theory (SDT) in a learner-centered paradigm. SDT makes specific prediction for nurturing vs. neglecting learning environments, and thus highly appropriate framework. An important differentiation between types of motivations that differs in relative autonomy, and social climates that may be perceived as amotivating, controlling, and informational is necessary for understanding learning and educational practices. Finally, practical recommendations for teachers in higher education to put into practice. It is argued for a system in which all levels of education supports motivation to support student motivation. Both the institutional level and teacher culture must have a learner centered perspective, further, pre-during-post class preparations are important for high quality learning.

Reference and link to the article

Jeno, L. M. (2015). Encouraging Active Learning in Higher Education: A Self-Determination Theory PerspectiveInternational Journal of Technology and Inclusive Education, 5(1), 716-721

 

About the author

Lucas M. Jeno : PhD student

Lucas M. Jeno

PhD student

 
I am a PhD candidate/scholar responsible of investigating teaching and learning related issues at bioCEED. My main interest is on student learning and motivation, and how teachers motivate their students.
 
My projects

+47 48 13 46 43
Lucas.Jeno@uib.no
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Developing Collaboration as a Transferrable Skills in Biology Tertiary Education

Torstein N. Hole, PhD student at bioCEED/PRIME, has recently published the article “Developing Collaboration as a Transferrable Skills in Biology Tertiary Education”.

Abstract

Transferable skills as a concept in tertiary education has received increased interest since the Bologna process and through developments in the work market. The concept as a learning goal is seen as a means for ensuring employability in a changing industrial economy as well as increasing legitimacy of skills that are desirable across different disciplines. In this paper I will present some means to develop legitimacy in transferable skill learning in discipline education in general and biology education specifically. A concrete focus is collaboration, which functions as an example of how the intangible nature of some educational goals requires a theoretical response. This is performed on the basis of theoretical conceptions about tacit and work-place learning.

Reference and link to the article

Hole, T. N. (2015). Developing Collaboration as a Transferrable Skills in Biology Tertiary Education. Literacy Information and Computer Education Journal, 6(3), 1971-1975.

 

About the author

Torstein Nielsen Hole : PhD student

Torstein Nielsen Hole

PhD student

 
I am a Ph.D student part of the PRIME project and bioCEED. I am responsible for assessing and researching approaches to student learning in practice activities such as the workplace and field-work.
 
My projects

+47 98 07 16 17
Torstein.Hole@uib.no
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